Original Steamer Photos

Ned

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Here's a large 35hp Nichols and Sheppard it must have been a brand new engine it almost shines even though it's a black and white photo, there's also a fair number of nicely dressed men standing all around the engine and plow.
 

Ned

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These two photos are of the same engine different views.
The engine is a 20ish hp Port Huron that fell through a bridge fortunately it doesn't look like it was that far of a drop but still a bad day.
 

Ned

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42533.jpeg
This one speaks for itself.
The engine is an Advance.
I've always wondered about this photo as my family has farm land relatively close to Fairmount N.D. and my grandma used to talk about the custom threshing crews coming to the farm. Could this be one of those crews that came to our farm???
 

Ned

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This photo was taken at the Agriculture college in Fargo now known as NDSU in 1909.
Engine unknown.
There are more people on things in this photo then are standing. I count 1 on the engine, 8 on the threshing machine, 1 on the top of the rail car and 2 more on the roof of the building.
 

Ned

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42536.jpeg This is a very early Case engine mid 1880s. This is one of the first engines Case made that could be moved by gearing and steered from the rear. Note that it still has a seat up by the stack for when being pulled by horses. The piece of wood going from the front wheel to the rear wheel is a block to stop the engine from moving, they clamped it in place and it prevents the wheels from turning.
 
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Jerry Christiansen

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Ned,

I agree about the wet bottom going through the bridge, not the best way to show off the features of your engine.

I wonder if the 110 pulling the plow, disk and drill is the same concept of the plow, packer and pony drill I remember people using when I was a kid.

Later,
Jerry Christiansen
 
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Ned

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Ned,

I agree about the wet bottom going through the bridge, not the best way to show off the features of your engine.

I wonder if the 110 pulling the plow, disk and drill is the same concept of the plow, packer and pony drill I remember people using when I was a kid.

Later,
Jerry Christiansen
I bet it was very similar to what you remember.
One of the frustrating things about the photos is wishing we had just a little different view or just a little more info. I'm still grateful they exist though
 

M Kerkvliet

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Here's a 110hp Case pulling an 8 bottom plow and behind that is maybe a disk or some other type of soil conditioner and then behind that looks like a grain drill.
Looks like the drill was a horse implement.

There is a guy out west of Medina a few miles that still pulls that same latch up... except with newer hydraulic stuff and this year a newer Magnum tractor. In prior years he had an old 70's era Versatile. I always want to get a picture, but I have to be safe driving by at 60 MPH.
 
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Stoerz

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View attachment 1873

I think this is a really cool photo. The engine is a Russell hauling a bunch of gravel wagons being buzzed by a early almost Wright brothers like airplane
I believe the aircraft is a 1909 Curtiss "Pusher" with a 90 HP OX-5 engine. Glenn Curtiss patented ailerons (which this plane has), the Wright Brothers were stuck selling airplanes with "wing warping" to control roll.
 
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Ned

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I believe the aircraft is a 1909 Curtiss "Pusher" with a 90 HP OX-5 engine. Glenn Curtiss patented ailerons (which this plane has), the Wright Brothers were stuck selling airplanes with "wing warping" to control roll.
So do you think it's a real unaltered photo?
 

Ned

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This photo if I remember correctly was taken in the early 50s. There's a good chance that's the Hawn family's 30-90 Russell.
 
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