Buffalo Springfield Roller Rebuild

Discussion in 'General Construction Discussion' started by Jerry Christiansen, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. Jerry Christiansen

    Jerry Christiansen Mega Poster WMSTR Lifetime Member

    Greetings all,

    Last summer a pile of steam roller parts arrived at Peter K's shop. Frank Orr has owned the engine for sometime and had it stored at another Rollag member's farm. The pictures below show many of the pieces now that they are moved inside.

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    This is a 10 ton roller that was built in 1928. As you can see, the kit marked "some assembly required".

    The boiler was deemded unusable and was deliverd to Lund Machine shop as a pattern for a new boiler.

    More later,
    Jerry Christiansen
     
  2. 40avery

    40avery Mega Poster Super Moderator WMSTR Lifetime Member

    I hope Peter still keeps the coffee pot hot in the shop. I will definitely be stopping by once in a while to see the project progress first hand.

    Thanks Jerry.:thumb:
     
  3. M Kerkvliet

    M Kerkvliet WMSTR Past President Administrator WMSTR Lifetime Member

    That will be a nice exhibit Jerry, "For What It's Worth" ! :rof: :rof:

    Looking forward to more pictures!

    Sorry... Couldn't resist!
     
  4. Jerry Christiansen

    Jerry Christiansen Mega Poster WMSTR Lifetime Member

    This roller has power steering, which is pretty important when a person thinks about trying to turn the roller on the front. Unlike the 110hp Case and the Case steam roller, the roller’s power steering operates with its own double cylinder engine. In the second picture of the first post you can see a shaft that goes across the top of the roller that has a small section of worm gear on it. Below the worm gear you can see a large section of a gear. That gear section is bolted to the top of the steering bolster and the teeth engage the worm gear. To the right of the worm gear is a chain sprocket. If the steering engine was in place, the chain from the sprocket drops down to the steering engine. When the engine runs one direction, the roller steers to the right. Running the engine the other direction steers the roller to the left.

    As you can imagine, the steering engine was not in prime shape.

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    This is the steering engine after several steps of rebuild. The threaded holes are not steam ports, they are the mounting locations for the cylinders. One cylinder can be seen in the foreground of the picture. Although it can’t be seen in this picture both bushings that hold the shaft have been replaced and bored to fit the new shaft.

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    This is a close up of the inside of the casing. The new bushing that supports one of the cylinders is shown here. The holes in the casing were bored out, then new bushings were made and pressed in. The hole on the top of the casting is an oil passage so that oil that is splashed around can lubricate the bushing.

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    More damage inside the engine. Notice the where the casting was broken and threaded holes were missing. The opening was machined out wider and deeper. The bolt holes were drilled deeper in good casting and threaded. Studs will be installed later to hold the engine halves together. The new crank shaft can also be seen here. The old shaft was only good enough to use for a pattern.

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    Here the engine is set together. This is not final assembly; you will notice the nuts that hold the cylinder caps on are not in place. The connecting rods from the cylinders fit on the crankshaft with the same “knife and fork” arrangement that is used in some V-twin motorcycle engines. The slots in the sides of the cylinders are the steam ports. The open hole at the top of the casting is for a breather that allows steam leakage to escape the engine. The engine has a drain on the bottom that isn’t shown in this picture. Occasionally the operator would open the drain to allow the condensate to run out. The engine runs with oil inside, so the operator would only drain out the water and put the plug back in when oil started coming out.

    More later,
    Jerry Christiansen
     
  5. Jerry Christiansen

    Jerry Christiansen Mega Poster WMSTR Lifetime Member

    Here are some final pictures of the steering engine.

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    The other half of the engine case is the foreground. The four slots in each of the machined surfaces are the steam ports. This explains the need for the breather. There is no way to make the two matching surfaces steam tight, steam will always leak past.

    Final assembly


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    The two pipe plugs are actually adjustments to hold the cylinder valve surface tight on the valve surface on the engine housing. The pipe on the top is the oil fill pipe.

    A look at the other side.


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    The plugs in the center are the steam inlets and outlets. The steering valve mounts on the engine and was not in ND at the time the picture was taken. Peter said the engine ran well on air.

    Later,
    Jerry Christiansen

     
  6. mrnewway

    mrnewway Mega Poster WMSTR Lifetime Member

    Jerry:
    Another outstanding post on a rebuild project by WMSTR members:thumb:
    Keep us updated on it's progress.
    Jim out west
     
  7. M Kerkvliet

    M Kerkvliet WMSTR Past President Administrator WMSTR Lifetime Member

    Fascinating engine Jerry! I have never seen anything like that!

    Could you get some video of it running on air?

    Are you guys going to have this roller ready for the MSEA steam up in a month? :D... OK... How about show time?

    Great thread! Keep us updated!
     
  8. Jerry Christiansen

    Jerry Christiansen Mega Poster WMSTR Lifetime Member

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